Boots, Beards and Communicators

BOOTS * BEARDS * COMMUNICATORS

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destineearial:

I see posts all of the time about gender and gaming. Ya’ll who say that “girls don’t game” need to hush and listen for a moment.

This is my Mimal. She’s my BFF. These pictures were taken last summer, they’re of her playing the Nintendo Entertainment System that she bought when it came out and was being popularized in America. She was a stay at home mom and she thought that this gaming system would be awesome for her family (my Pipaw, my Uncle Joey, and my Mom) at night when they had game time. She used to play during the day when her kids were at school. She used to play Tetris (which, as a result of, my Mom is wicked at) and other games for this system. I

This is her, at 62, kicking MY ass at Super Mario Bros. When I was growing up I’d go to her house, eat SpaghettiOs and play this same game. I couldn’t beat the castle worlds. She did it for me.  She taught me the places where I could find hidden 1UPs, world jumps, and stars. When I was young she patiently waited as I learned the mechanics of the game. When I got older she gave me guidance on the finer skills, like not jumping off a ledge. Mimal can find the turtle on the stairs and get like a bazillion extra lives. It’s crazy.

So, I’ve ranted that she’s good at the game but I would like to make one thing clear. She has fun when she’s playing this game. To her, it meant family time, alone/decompression time, and a challenge for her to explore and conquer. She’s a gamer because she likes to game.

This woman is a gamer. This woman is my Mimal. So if you think that women can’t be gamers you just think on the fact that she’s been beating Bowser’s ass for two generations. And she’s been loving every minute of it.

(via themarysue)

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Should Cap, as Vulture suggests, be more old-fashioned in his attitudes on gender, race or sexuality? I’m inclined to think not. For one, World War II saw massive social upheaval in both the first two categories, and we’ve already seen Cap work alongside a strong, authoritarian woman, so it seems weird that he’d suddenly have a problem with that. He’s also well established as both an underdog himself and a champion of same, so it would be strange for him to suddenly take a stance against tolerance. Rogers is not a man desperate to prove himself; he remains the same kid that he was underneath, trying to do what he feels is right rather than subscribing to some outside notion of machismo that demands he also be sexist or homophobic or something. And aside from any questions of decency and responsible filmmaking, from a storytelling point of view it would be endlessly distracting if Cap suddenly started making homophobic statements or patting passing women on the butt (he wasn’t exactly a ladykiller in the ’40s; why would he suddenly turn boorish now?).

What’s important and interesting about Cap is exactly what some people dismiss as boring. It’s that decency and honesty and sense of moral authority. In a film world full of compromised characters, flawed protagonists and out-and-out anti-heroes, Steve Rogers is a breath of fresh air. Someone with no secrets, who literally wears his high ideals as a uniform and gets on with the job at hand, is far more interesting than any number of self-torturing, whiny man-children.
Why Do People Think Captain America Is Boring? (via chujo-hime)

(via expostninja)